Books

This page lists the books I have written, gives a quick synopsis of each.

Brave Festival coverThe Brave Festival is a novella of 38,000 words about a post office robbery that goes wrong and sees the perpetrators hiding out in a suicidal old man’s house for a hot weekend in July 2009.  Tom, the old man who mourns the death of his recently deceased estranged wife, pushes against the criminals who are trying to hold things together after the botched robbery.  Toms friend, and local Garda Sergeant, Charley is looking for the men but never suspects that they would be holed up in a house in his town.  The murder in the post office has unbalanced his routine and he feels as though he is not up to the job at hand.  Can he save Tom before there is another murder?

BookCoverImageThe Great Brutality is a collection of short stories told from the point of view of various males from ages 15 up to 60 in different time-frames and locations.  Issues dealt with included broken relationships, guilt, death and isolation.  Stories include a man who feels compelled to climb the church tower in Dun Laoghaire, miners in Romania after the fall of communism, a small island where only one man remains unemployed after the recession and a menacing apparition appears to a man as he and his wife are expecting their first child (Not autobiographical!) as well as a few more.

The Case for Skeletons CoverThe Case for Skeletons is a novella of 25,000 words about Mitch Uncle Boney who  has had the misfortune to have been born as a skeleton.  The story tells of his search for a normal life as a twenty something in Dublin in the early 21st century and the man he meets who may have the power to make all of his wildest dreams come true.

Michelin Cover Michelin is a novella of 40,000 words about the early life of Mitch Uncle Boney.

You may know Mitch Uncle Boney from the lies of ‘The Case for Skeletons’ but in this novella we see the real man who was born a skeleton.
We learn of Mitch’s upbringing and his entry into the working world of an adult.
Things seem to be going OK until he tries to rent a room in his house. The result is threatening phone calls and letters, drinking binges, violence, new friendships and an ever growing tally of enemies.
Life is never simple, but when you are a skeleton in today’s world nothing is simple at all.

medium The Story of Furniture Anderson is a novella of 37,000 Words about the run up to the All Ireland Football Final in September 2013.

“Sport is like life – they’re both shit!” (Francis Anderson Circa 1978)

The All Ireland final is approaching and the whole of Dublin is in party mode waiting with anticipation of it. All except Furniture Anderson who instead is grappling with growing up (even though he’s already 28!) his name, his best friends mother making advances on him, a French fry stealing French model; his relationship to Pamela Anderson, his fathers disillusionment that he doesn’t share his love of the sport and his grandfathers sometimes quoted ramblings.

He wants to fit in but none of these things will let him!

dfw-rm-td-cover-3d-nologoThe Dolocher is a novel of 64,000 words set in Dublin in 1788.  Here is the back blurb:  In 1788 the Dolocher roamed the dark streets of Dublin seeking victims from those who travelled the night alone. It struck fear into the people of the city. They never knew what he looked like for sure, rumours were abound of a giant black creature that could walk on hind legs and moved silently in the darkness. It was said that the beast carried the soul of Thomas Olocher the crazed murderer who had taken his own life in the towers of ‘The Black Dog’ prison and it carried on his murderous legacy looking for the girl who had put him in prison.

 

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